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DCIPHER
Senior Member



1080 Posts

 Posted - 01/23/2012 :  2:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply to this posting
http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/americas/brit-skier-felicity-aston-completes-antarctic-journey---first-to-cross-with-only-muscle-power/2012/01/23/gIQANDxQKQ_story.html

pmicheals
Advanced Member


Richmond, BC
Canada

2662 Posts

 Posted - 01/23/2012 :  4:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
incredible
ClubTread Supporter

Wildman
Advanced Member

Trail blazin', backcountry bushwackin', pine huntin', photo takin', long winded story teller


3943 Posts

 Posted - 01/23/2012 :  5:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So before something like this nonsence quoted below gets posted. In her words:

"“I’m still reeling from the shock of it that I’ve made it this far. I honestly didn’t think I’d be getting here,” she said.

What remains, she hopes, will be a message about perseverance.

“If you can just find a way to keep going, either metaphorically or literally, whether you’re running a marathon or facing financial problems or have bad news to deliver or it’s tough at work or whatever, if you can just find a way to keep going, then you will discover that you have potential within yourself that you never never realized,” she said.

“Keeping going is the important thing, persevering, no matter how messy that gets. I mean, for me, sometimes I’ll be sitting in my tent in the morning bawling my eyes out, having tantrums. It’s not been pretty. But I’ve kept going, and that is the important thing because at some point in the future you’ll look back and just be amazed at how far you’ve come.”

___




quote:
To be honest, this man seems like a dimbulb, and I hope he doesn't receive any attention. I would not want kids, or other members of society attempting such an ill-conceived trip, which has, even in the first leg, relied completely on the kindness of strangers in random encounters.

While such an epic journey, might be admirable in dire condtitions eg. find water for one's village, in this culture and era, it's hugely irresponsible, and I would not want kids, to emulate him. I doubt many parents would want their kids to do so, with a similar level of planning (as his own, apparently, much more level-headed father attests to).

It is almost inconceivable to me...the reasoning that goes into a man who had a "revelation" that he was able to bike across Canada the previous year, into not having much "fear" about trying this.

I hope he continues to receive all the support he needs not to get killed (I am glad to see, he has people ready to pick him up), but I wouldn't want to see such a misadventure applauded. If any member of this community went on a hike or climb, with a similar level of planning, experience, and reliance on random support from strangers, they'd be eviscerated, and rightly so (Luckily, another party happened along, and I borrowed water from them...then further on, another party spared some water and food, then thank god, another party saw me, and I got water from them....).

I also think the notion of "self-support", is just self-serving hype....since he has full support at each stop, as well as getting random services from strangers, and, has already called friends to pick him up to take him out of a leg, he's really just trying to avoid the illusion of not having a support crew...when in fact it would be wise (and his case needed) to have one. That would be smart planning, much more self-sufficient, and not so irresponsible, but not sound as good at first glance on paper.




Edited by - Wildman on 01/23/2012 5:27 PM

DCIPHER
Senior Member



1080 Posts

 Posted - 01/23/2012 :  5:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Wildman

So before something like this nonsence quoted below gets posted. In her words:

"“I’m still reeling from the shock of it that I’ve made it this far. I honestly didn’t think I’d be getting here,” she said.

What remains, she hopes, will be a message about perseverance.

“If you can just find a way to keep going, either metaphorically or literally, whether you’re running a marathon or facing financial problems or have bad news to deliver or it’s tough at work or whatever, if you can just find a way to keep going, then you will discover that you have potential within yourself that you never never realized,” she said.

“Keeping going is the important thing, persevering, no matter how messy that gets. I mean, for me, sometimes I’ll be sitting in my tent in the morning bawling my eyes out, having tantrums. It’s not been pretty. But I’ve kept going, and that is the important thing because at some point in the future you’ll look back and just be amazed at how far you’ve come.”

___




quote:
To be honest, this man seems like a dimbulb, and I hope he doesn't receive any attention. I would not want kids, or other members of society attempting such an ill-conceived trip, which has, even in the first leg, relied completely on the kindness of strangers in random encounters.

While such an epic journey, might be admirable in dire condtitions eg. find water for one's village, in this culture and era, it's hugely irresponsible, and I would not want kids, to emulate him. I doubt many parents would want their kids to do so, with a similar level of planning (as his own, apparently, much more level-headed father attests to).

It is almost inconceivable to me...the reasoning that goes into a man who had a "revelation" that he was able to bike across Canada the previous year, into not having much "fear" about trying this.

I hope he continues to receive all the support he needs not to get killed (I am glad to see, he has people ready to pick him up), but I wouldn't want to see such a misadventure applauded. If any member of this community went on a hike or climb, with a similar level of planning, experience, and reliance on random support from strangers, they'd be eviscerated, and rightly so (Luckily, another party happened along, and I borrowed water from them...then further on, another party spared some water and food, then thank god, another party saw me, and I got water from them....).

I also think the notion of "self-support", is just self-serving hype....since he has full support at each stop, as well as getting random services from strangers, and, has already called friends to pick him up to take him out of a leg, he's really just trying to avoid the illusion of not having a support crew...when in fact it would be wise (and his case needed) to have one. That would be smart planning, much more self-sufficient, and not so irresponsible, but not sound as good at first glance on paper.







SIGH. This just takes childish to a new level.

Yes...there's no difference at all right? My judgment should be exactly the same right?

No, I'm sorry. ALL adventurous endeavor are not the same.

Please, if you don't understand the difference between the two completely disparate cases, OR if you don't wish to discuss them like (NOW THAT would be a good discussion) adults, why bother posting. TO be honest, you simply make yourself look juvenile.


MORE IMPORTANT, by trying to compare the two, you TRIVIALIZE her incredibly preparation, her past experience (LOOK UP HER BIO, it's on her website). MAN it's DISRESPECTFUL!

That's all you get out of this eh? The last line about determination....you think perhaps that she'd tell anyone just go try it, or maybe something more extreme (dangerous to others even), if they just have determination? Right? As I wrote in the thread about the other man, most of the determination and perseverance that is truly admirable, comes in the YEARS of preparation, training, experience etc.

I hope you're trolling just to get a rise out of me.


Edited by - DCIPHER on 01/23/2012 5:43 PM

sgRant
Advanced Member


Vancouver
2583 Posts

 Posted - 01/23/2012 :  9:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Very impressive. And different in fundamental ways from a winter highway bicycle ride.

The article says she said she thought she was doomed when she found both her butane lighters wouldn't work. This seemed odd.

Is this from the altitude or the cold? Wouldn't they work if she kept them warmer in some inner clothing? She said it was from the altitude. Wouldn't the lower air pressure at 10,000' encourage the gas to escape the lighter rather than the opposite?

I hope people like this are doing something to balance the huge carbon footprint of such expeditions. Otherwise they're ruining the very places that host their adventures. (Had to make a wet blanket comment.)

troutbreath
Junior Member


Newton, bc
Canada

300 Posts

 Posted - 01/23/2012 :  10:37 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Holy chaffing thighs. 59 days skiing and my lower torso would be a blister pack. Good on her though.

sgRant
Advanced Member


Vancouver
2583 Posts

 Posted - 01/23/2012 :  10:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here are descriptions of this season's private expeditions in Antarctica, with links to their websites. This is just the ones that involve the South Pole.

http://www.southpolestation.com/news/news.html#sports

Edited by - sgRant on 01/23/2012 11:00 PM

DCIPHER
Senior Member



1080 Posts

 Posted - 01/24/2012 :  01:27 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sgRant

Very impressive. And different in fundamental ways from a winter highway bicycle ride.




Yes, several fundamental ways...

This story even highlights how even for the experienced veteran, unexpected risks can be there (eg. the lighters)...of course that's a far cry from praying ice road truckers can get out of the way, or begging for water on the first day of a bike trip...

But there's always a fine line about how much risk is acceptable, and to be clear (as some people seem do seem to have a lot of trouble understanding this), I have no problem if somebody thinks this woman was foolish. In fact, I'd love to hear that opinion, and the reasons as to why!

As I recall, my only point was that the other guy's attempt looked to me like a terrible role model for kids. This woman's feat sounds like a great example, of somebody who had plenty of relevant experience, preparation, training, and then went out and did something amazing after setting herself up to be successful! That's a role model for anything!



sgRant
Advanced Member


Vancouver
2583 Posts

 Posted - 01/24/2012 :  1:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Though her trip is still impressive, the more I find out about it, the less impressive it seems. Sounds like there were several 6WD trucks roaming around Antarctica supporting her, and some people associated with the trucks, possibly including her, were skiing in the tracks broken by the trucks. This won't rank as one of the great expeditions.

I did notice none of the expeditions were cited as using snowshoes.

Candy Sack
Intermediate Member


over the hills and far away
Canada

940 Posts

 Posted - 01/24/2012 :  4:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sgRant

Though her trip is still impressive, the more I find out about it, the less impressive it seems. Sounds like there were several 6WD trucks roaming around Antarctica supporting her, and some people associated with the trucks, possibly including her, were skiing in the tracks broken by the trucks. This won't rank as one of the great expeditions.

I did notice none of the expeditions were cited as using snowshoes.



So first it was very impressive, now it's less impressive.... make up your mind man-- you're too dam hard to impress!

sgRant
Advanced Member


Vancouver
2583 Posts

 Posted - 01/25/2012 :  12:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Candy Sack

quote:
Originally posted by sgRant

Though her trip is still impressive, the more I find out about it, the less impressive it seems. Sounds like there were several 6WD trucks roaming around Antarctica supporting her, and some people associated with the trucks, possibly including her, were skiing in the tracks broken by the trucks. This won't rank as one of the great expeditions.

I did notice none of the expeditions were cited as using snowshoes.



So first it was very impressive, now it's less impressive.... make up your mind man-- you're too dam hard to impress!



That's a valid point. Very few people could have done what this person did, and initially I was high on the scale of being impressed. However, I should have thoroughly researched what she did before posting. The story about the lighters made me wonder. The accomplishment diminished the more I read about it. I guess there's no law that says people doing such things have to list up-front the parameters of their outing.

For instance, there are the One-Degree folks. Who fly to within one degree of the north or south poles and then travel on foot the rest of the way. I'd say that's not a big accomplishment, but they can still say they skied to the pole. In fact, given the resources needed to do a One-Degree trip, I'd say it's something to be ashamed of. The north and south poles seem to be becoming more of a circus.

peter1955
Advanced Member



2428 Posts

 Posted - 01/25/2012 :  1:02 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's another one, the Polo-to-Pole Run:

http://icetrek.expenews.com/es/expeditions/235/dispatches/3446

peter1955
Advanced Member



2428 Posts

 Posted - 01/25/2012 :  1:06 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sgRant

Here are descriptions of this season's private expeditions in Antarctica, with links to their websites. This is just the ones that involve the South Pole.

http://www.southpolestation.com/news/news.html#sports



That's an impressive list!

So the South Pole will become the next trendy Adventure Destination? Kind of a cold Galapagos or a frozen Kilimanjaro?

Or like the West Coast Trail? And look what's happened to THAT one!

Edited by - peter1955 on 01/25/2012 1:20 PM
ClubTread Supporter

Dru
Mountain Grammar Police

Sardonic sandbagging scoundrel, Cascade Climbers lobotomized spraymeister, space blanket flyer, new millennium vulgarian betaboy and friend to all squids

Climbing, a mountain
Canada

∞ Posts

 Posted - 01/25/2012 :  1:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sgRant

quote:
Originally posted by Candy Sack

quote:
Originally posted by sgRant

Though her trip is still impressive, the more I find out about it, the less impressive it seems. Sounds like there were several 6WD trucks roaming around Antarctica supporting her, and some people associated with the trucks, possibly including her, were skiing in the tracks broken by the trucks. This won't rank as one of the great expeditions.

I did notice none of the expeditions were cited as using snowshoes.



So first it was very impressive, now it's less impressive.... make up your mind man-- you're too dam hard to impress!



That's a valid point. Very few people could have done what this person did, and initially I was high on the scale of being impressed. However, I should have thoroughly researched what she did before posting. The story about the lighters made me wonder. The accomplishment diminished the more I read about it. I guess there's no law that says people doing such things have to list up-front the parameters of their outing.

For instance, there are the One-Degree folks. Who fly to within one degree of the north or south poles and then travel on foot the rest of the way. I'd say that's not a big accomplishment, but they can still say they skied to the pole. In fact, given the resources needed to do a One-Degree trip, I'd say it's something to be ashamed of. The north and south poles seem to be becoming more of a circus.



This guy is legit: Erden Eruc

http://www.around-n-over.org/circumnavigation.htm
ClubTread Supporter

Dru
Mountain Grammar Police

Sardonic sandbagging scoundrel, Cascade Climbers lobotomized spraymeister, space blanket flyer, new millennium vulgarian betaboy and friend to all squids

Climbing, a mountain
Canada

∞ Posts

 Posted - 01/25/2012 :  1:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
given the resources needed



This is a false analysis. Say that on a three week ski tour you eat 4000 calories a day, whereas at home you eat 2000. Given the increased resource use you could stay at home for the same three weeks, eat less food since not exercising you have lower caloric requirements, and use the excess to feed the starving?

In fact there is no physical activity that does not use more energy and resources than vegetating.

leimrod
Senior Member


Squamish, British Columbia
Canada

1346 Posts

 Posted - 01/25/2012 :  2:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dru

quote:
given the resources needed



This is a false analysis. Say that on a three week ski tour you eat 4000 calories a day, whereas at home you eat 2000. Given the increased resource use you could stay at home for the same three weeks, eat less food since not exercising you have lower caloric requirements, and use the excess to feed the starving?

In fact there is no physical activity that does not use more energy and resources than vegetating.



A good dose of reductio ad absurdum... nice . There has to a line though between the activity undertaken and the resources used to accomplish it. I believe this is why the Alpine Style of mountaineering has gained more and more popularity over the old Siege Style of mountaineering.

Your reply reminded me of this Louis CK bit though, heh:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lC4FnfNKwUo

sgRant
Advanced Member


Vancouver
2583 Posts

 Posted - 01/26/2012 :  10:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dru

quote:
given the resources needed



This is a false analysis. Say that on a three week ski tour you eat 4000 calories a day, whereas at home you eat 2000. Given the increased resource use you could stay at home for the same three weeks, eat less food since not exercising you have lower caloric requirements, and use the excess to feed the starving?

In fact there is no physical activity that does not use more energy and resources than vegetating.



What I had in mind was the logistical support for such trips. The transportation resources needed to get a person from home to the 89th degree, and home again from the pole, just don't justify the benefit to someone's ego.

A few years ago I turned down an offer of free airfare to go on a sea-ice ski expedition near Bylot Island. I turned it down because I couldn't justify burning that much fuel just to wander around for a few weeks as a tourist. If it had been for science, it would have been a different matter. 15 years earlier, I probably would have gone. But climate change wasn't known to be as serious a problem then.

sgRant
Advanced Member


Vancouver
2583 Posts

 Posted - 01/26/2012 :  10:36 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by peter1955

Here's another one, the Polo-to-Pole Run:

http://icetrek.expenews.com/es/expeditions/235/dispatches/3446



"And since he was running and not carrying/pulling anything, he was supported by a crew in one of those ALE Ford vans." (in Antarctica)

from http://www.southpolestation.com/news/news.html#sports

Edited by - sgRant on 01/26/2012 10:37 AM

sgRant
Advanced Member


Vancouver
2583 Posts

 Posted - 01/26/2012 :  10:41 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dru
This guy is legit: Erden Eruc

http://www.around-n-over.org/circumnavigation.htm



Agreed.

peter1955
Advanced Member



2428 Posts

 Posted - 01/26/2012 :  12:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And:

http://www.expenews.com/en/expeditions/236/dispatches/3435

'Ski the Last Degree' = 113 km.

and drive the rest of the way there and back.

Just more tourists.

DCIPHER
Senior Member



1080 Posts

 Posted - 01/26/2012 :  1:48 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by sgRant

quote:
Originally posted by Candy Sack

quote:
Originally posted by sgRant

Though her trip is still impressive, the more I find out about it, the less impressive it seems. Sounds like there were several 6WD trucks roaming around Antarctica supporting her, and some people associated with the trucks, possibly including her, were skiing in the tracks broken by the trucks. This won't rank as one of the great expeditions.

I did notice none of the expeditions were cited as using snowshoes.



So first it was very impressive, now it's less impressive.... make up your mind man-- you're too dam hard to impress!



That's a valid point. Very few people could have done what this person did, and initially I was high on the scale of being impressed. However, I should have thoroughly researched what she did before posting. The story about the lighters made me wonder. The accomplishment diminished the more I read about it. I guess there's no law that says people doing such things have to list up-front the parameters of their outing.

For instance, there are the One-Degree folks. Who fly to within one degree of the north or south poles and then travel on foot the rest of the way. I'd say that's not a big accomplishment, but they can still say they skied to the pole. In fact, given the resources needed to do a One-Degree trip, I'd say it's something to be ashamed of. The north and south poles seem to be becoming more of a circus.



You have very right to reevaluate your judgment upon hearing more information. In fact, to not do so would be....utterly asinine! But where did you read about the skiing in the trucks tracks and the support?? I did read some truckers met up with her, but in the very limited account it just sounded like a one-off meeting...
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