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 Mountaineering, Scrambling, and Climbing
 Training your fingers and toes to withstand cold
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Zoran
Intermediate Member


Burnaby, BC
Canada

523 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2011 :  2:15 PM  Show Profile  Reply to this posting
http://runningmagazine.ca/2011/11/sections/training/blogs/training-your-fingers-and-toes-to-withstand-cold/


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22081047

Edited by - Zoran on 12/02/2011 2:16 PM

robdabanc
New Member


Kitsilano, BC
Canada

86 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2011 :  4:28 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
very cool, this is something that really bothers me when winter camping.
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Dru
Mountain Grammar Police

Sardonic sandbagging scoundrel, Cascade Climbers lobotomized spraymeister, space blanket flyer, new millennium vulgarian betaboy and friend to all squids

Climbing, a mountain
Canada

∞ Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2011 :  5:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
messner used to walk around his home town carrying snowballs in his bare hands - this is nothing new
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Matt
Senior Member


Langley, BC
Canada

1094 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2011 :  5:47 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Wonder if it works for "shrinkage."

robdabanc
New Member


Kitsilano, BC
Canada

86 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2011 :  6:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Matt

Wonder if it works for "shrinkage."



only one way to find out...

swebster
Senior Member


Vancouver, BC
Canada

1361 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2011 :  7:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Dru

messner used to walk around his home town carrying snowballs in his bare hands - this is nothing new



Doesn't this study say that Messner didn't know what he was doing?

Zoran
Intermediate Member


Burnaby, BC
Canada

523 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2011 :  7:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Don Whillans was climbing Ben Nevis routes in wool socks in winter, to practice for Himalayas. He knew what he was doing ...
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Dru
Mountain Grammar Police

Sardonic sandbagging scoundrel, Cascade Climbers lobotomized spraymeister, space blanket flyer, new millennium vulgarian betaboy and friend to all squids

Climbing, a mountain
Canada

∞ Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2011 :  8:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by swebster

quote:
Originally posted by Dru

messner used to walk around his home town carrying snowballs in his bare hands - this is nothing new



Doesn't this study say that Messner didn't know what he was doing?



They'd have to do a study with 0C snow for that. 8C water, as used in the study, is a relative hotspring by comparison.

DCIPHER
Senior Member



1080 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2011 :  8:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by swebster

quote:
Originally posted by Dru

messner used to walk around his home town carrying snowballs in his bare hands - this is nothing new



Doesn't this study say that Messner didn't know what he was doing?



Too limited to make overall conclusions for sure, but yes, technically, based on this study alone, you'd be better off with NO cold exposure prior...

pipestone
New Member



71 Posts

 Posted - 12/03/2011 :  07:07 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I suppose one could gradually train oneself to ignore the pain and discomfort of the slow freezing of extremities on a cold winter day, and that in itself wouldn't be all that difficult to do over time, but that doesn't do much for preventing the damage of frostbite. Rather, I think one should be more concerned about preventing frostbite as once the tissue is damaged, it may be permanent.

What a person can do is train and condition limbs so there is a well-developed capillary bed and excellent circulation to those limbs. I am always amazed how I can go for a run wearing a thin pair of socks and light runners when it is -20 C and not have to worry about getting cold feet. In my opinion its all about circulation and not pain tolerance.
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Matt
Senior Member


Langley, BC
Canada

1094 Posts

 Posted - 12/03/2011 :  12:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
It appears to me that the decrease in pain correlates with an increase in skin temperature? This might reduce frostbite risk? It would increase hypothermia risk though.
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