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 Best SD memory card for 1080p HD video?
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Vertical_Trekker
Junior Member


West Coast, British Columbia
Canada

220 Posts

 Posted - 08/29/2011 :  10:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply to this posting
I just bought a new camera that can shoot 1080p HD video.

Will any CLASS 6 SD memory card work for 1080p HD video?

Or, will I have to go for a CLASS 10 for 1080p HD video in order for it to work?

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BillyGoat
Advanced Member

Satirical photoshop junkie who frolics in the mountains of the Chilliwack River Valley

Aldergrove, BC
Canada

7329 Posts

 Posted - 08/29/2011 :  10:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I use a class 10 for my 1080p video. Panasonic makes a pretty decent professional level class 10 that's cheaper than the Sandisk or Lexars.

Matin
Junior Member


Vancouver, bc
Canada

152 Posts

 Posted - 08/29/2011 :  11:08 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
get class 10. class 6 is slow.
I recommend Panasonic as well.

Marko
Senior Member


Calgary, Alberta
Canada

1596 Posts

 Posted - 08/30/2011 :  05:08 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Class 6 and class 10 may not mean much. Class 10 is a fairly new category and memory cards were much faster before the category was created. In fact, there are many that are faster than Class 10 and there is no category for them. The SD Association is unfortunately too slow creating these, but the idea is great. What you need to look for is the "x" rating or the actual MB/s number which is sometimes listed in the spec sheet.

Here's what the classes mean:

Class 6 means the card reads and writes at least 6 megabytes per second
Class 10 means the card reads and writes at least 10 megabytes per second

The "x" number gives you the actual speed. Each x = 150 KB/s. So if you have a card that says 150x that means it reads and writes at 22.5 megabytes per second (150 x 150KB/s = 22,500KB/s or 22.5MB/s), which means it could be both Class 6 and Class 10. It really should be in a category of Class 22, but there is no such category, so they either put it as Class 6 on the market, or if they manufactured it after the new class was created, they would have labelled it Class 10.

Most cards should indicate the "x" number or the actual MB/s. Unfortunately SanDisk started this trend where instead of using actual numbers they started naming their cards "ultra", "extreme" "extreme pro" "ultra extreme pro" "crazy ultra super extreme pro fast" to appeal to the dumb-ass consumer. They were successful, everyone thinks they're the best and they pay a hell of a lot more money to have their fancily named cards. Fortunately the SD Association started regulating the speeds with those class numbers, they're just a bit slow to catch up.

Edited by - Marko on 08/30/2011 05:24 AM

pmjwright
Intermediate Member


Salmon Arm, BC
Canada

970 Posts

 Posted - 09/12/2011 :  2:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Good description Marco.

Anyway, I've used Class 6 cards without any problems for video. Mainly shooting hockey games I found it was plenty fast enough to write to the card between the whistle and next puck drop with time to spare. Still, when I found a 32 Gb Class 10 card on eBay for less than the (really good) sale price of a 16 Gb Class 6 at Staples, I bought it. Honestly, I didn't notice much difference in write speeds.

Edited by - pmjwright on 09/12/2011 2:41 PM

booewen
Intermediate Member


Edmonton, Alberta
Canada

828 Posts

 Posted - 09/12/2011 :  2:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Speed varies among cards of a given class.

I have some Class 6 cards that work fine for recording 1080p HD video, and some other brand cards that don't work OK. Basically their buffer fills up at the start of recording sometimes and then it automatically stops and then you have to press record again. Interestingly it always works fine second time around. The problems are always in the first few moments. This is really annoying when shooting a live event though and can lead to missed crucial moments. And it's not just the cheap cards that are a problem here. I have Sandisk and Kingston Class 6 cards that mess up.

Class 10 will guarantee no problems. Hopefully.

pmjwright
Intermediate Member


Salmon Arm, BC
Canada

970 Posts

 Posted - 09/13/2011 :  1:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Yes, YMMV.

FYI my Class 6 cards are Verbatim Premium. According to their website, minimum Write speed for this brand is (60x) 9MB/sec and Read speed is (133x) 20MB/sec. In a google search I found tests showing actual write speeds of 10.7 MB/sec for medium/large files. Therefore it's virtually class 10. I suppose that's the reason I've never had a problem with them.

And no, I didn't do any research before I bought. They were the best deal (around half price at Staples), I just lucked out on the speed.

Meanwhile, my Transcend class 10 card boasted of 16 MB/sec write and 20 MB read speed, but actual speeds have been tested to be 13.4 and 18.7.

Edited by - pmjwright on 09/13/2011 2:17 PM
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seawallrunner
Advanced Member

double-double seeking, snow-chasing, short-cutting, vertical feet collector


4590 Posts

 Posted - 09/13/2011 :  2:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
How do you test your cards' speed? Is there an online tool that one can use?
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BillyGoat
Advanced Member

Satirical photoshop junkie who frolics in the mountains of the Chilliwack River Valley

Aldergrove, BC
Canada

7329 Posts

 Posted - 09/13/2011 :  7:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There's also the issue of how fast your camera is able to write to the card. Cheaper cameras write slower and have smaller buffers. If your camera is only capable of writing to the card at a class 6 speed, then a class 10 won't help you.
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Matt
Senior Member


Langley, BC
Canada

1094 Posts

 Posted - 09/13/2011 :  7:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The 1080p HD video sets the data rate in this case, as this would be constant across camera brands I would imagine, and I think it is around 6-7MB/s for MPEG, higher for AVCHD I think.

Edited by - Matt on 09/13/2011 8:00 PM

Vertical_Trekker
Junior Member


West Coast, British Columbia
Canada

220 Posts

 Posted - 09/13/2011 :  9:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I discovered that Sandisk advertises on their package that their Class 6 SD memory cards can handle 1080p video. Also, Gordon Laing from Cameralabs.com said that all you need is Class 6 for 1080p video.

So, it comes down to reliability and performance. I've seen some videos on Youtube using 1080p video with the same camera I'm using with a class 6 memory card and it's very smooth and natural without any hiccups. I actually sent a message to those who made their videos and I asked them the speed of their memory cards.

Interestingly, with my Lexar Class 4 SD memory card, I can't even get friggin' 720p video!!!
So, the brand of memory cards makes a big difference.






pmjwright
Intermediate Member


Salmon Arm, BC
Canada

970 Posts

 Posted - 09/14/2011 :  11:06 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
How do you test your cards' speed? Is there an online tool that one can use?


I haven't tested my cards and don't know how, but a google search for "(insert your brand here) SDHC card review" or "SDHC card speed" will come up with some results and occasionally methods from others who have done actual tests. Steve's Digicams forums are another good source.

Vertical_Trekker
Junior Member


West Coast, British Columbia
Canada

220 Posts

 Posted - 09/19/2011 :  6:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just tested out my new Sandisk Extreme HD Class 10 SDHC card for my new Canon Elph 300HS camera and the performance was just horrible. Extremely jerky when panning for my new Canon P&S camera for 1080p. As a matter of fact, everything was jerky as heck, even the zooming was jerky. A total trainwreck for this Made in Japan Canon camera.

The video quality wasn't great too. I've had better and smoother performance with a Class 2 SD memory card on an older non HD video 640 x 480 resolution on an old 2006 model Panasonic P&S camera. What's even more sad is that the video quality of 1080p HD is about as good as my 2006 model Panasonic LZ5 camera!

I bought this camera in Montana at Wal-Mart.

Anyone here familiar with Wal-Mart return policies for Canada if an item was purchased in the U.S.?

Edited by - Vertical_Trekker on 09/19/2011 6:24 PM

Steventy
Advanced Member



2043 Posts

 Posted - 09/19/2011 :  6:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Vertical_Trekker

I just tested out my new Sandisk Extreme HD Class 10 SDHC card for my new Canon Elph 300HS camera and the performance was just horrible. Extremely jerky when panning for my new Canon P&S camera for 1080p. As a matter of fact, everything was jerky as heck, even the zooming was jerky. A total trainwreck for this Made in Japan Canon camera.

The video quality wasn't great too. I've had better and smoother performance with a Class 2 SD memory card on an older non HD video 640 x 480 resolution on an old 2006 model Panasonic P&S camera. What's even more sad is that the video quality of 1080p HD is about as good as my 2006 model Panasonic LZ5 camera!

I bought this camera in Montana at Wal-Mart.

Anyone here familiar with Wal-Mart return policies for Canada if an item was purchased in the U.S.?



Did you replay the video on the camera or on your computer?

I ask because my computer isn't a dinosaur quite yet but it struggles to play back the highest quality video that my camera can record. The camera is capable of playing it back fine and the files would play smoothly if I had a faster computer.

Vertical_Trekker
Junior Member


West Coast, British Columbia
Canada

220 Posts

 Posted - 09/19/2011 :  7:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've played HD video at 1080p resolution video on my computer without problems with other video files.

On video files with this Canon Elph 300HS camera, even resized to the smallest window for the Apple Quicktime player, it exhibits the same kind of jerkiness when viewed full screen.

There is definately something wrong with this camera.





Steventy
Advanced Member



2043 Posts

 Posted - 09/19/2011 :  9:51 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Vertical_Trekker

I've played HD video at 1080p resolution video on my computer without problems with other video files.

On video files with this Canon Elph 300HS camera, even resized to the smallest window for the Apple Quicktime player, it exhibits the same kind of jerkiness when viewed full screen.

There is definately something wrong with this camera.





Very weird. And it is even jerky when played back on the camera?

The return policy for cameras at Walmart is about two weeks and I don't think they allow cross border returns. In the US (maybe Canada?) they allow returns without a receipt which seems like a good way to get around the two week limit and possibly the border limit - you can only get a gift card in exchange if it is an expensive item.
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Matt
Senior Member


Langley, BC
Canada

1094 Posts

 Posted - 09/19/2011 :  10:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Vertical_Trekker

I've played HD video at 1080p resolution video on my computer without problems with other video files.

On video files with this Canon Elph 300HS camera, even resized to the smallest window for the Apple Quicktime player, it exhibits the same kind of jerkiness when viewed full screen.

There is definately something wrong with this camera.




Are you sure it's not a PEBKAC error? The lens records what it sees.

Vertical_Trekker
Junior Member


West Coast, British Columbia
Canada

220 Posts

 Posted - 09/20/2011 :  08:55 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I read some reviews and they mentioned that the video gets jerky when the camera is panned.

I spoke with a customer service representative for Wal-Mart Canada and the customer service representative told me that getting a refund in Canada for U.S. purchases depend on the manager for the store.

I've had this camera for over 2 weeks because I've been searching for a fast enough memory card for this camera.

booewen
Intermediate Member


Edmonton, Alberta
Canada

828 Posts

 Posted - 09/20/2011 :  4:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Vertical_Trekker

I've played HD video at 1080p resolution video on my computer without problems with other video files.

On video files with this Canon Elph 300HS camera, even resized to the smallest window for the Apple Quicktime player, it exhibits the same kind of jerkiness when viewed full screen.

There is definately something wrong with this camera.



All 1080p video is not equal. The amount of computer power it takes to play a video is dependent both on the resolution and the codec used for the video. Particularly consumer camcorders use complicated codecs that heavily compress the video. AVCHD is a good example of this. The result is a package that takes a lot of computer to understand/decode during playback on your screen.

I would imagine that this is the problem.

You can test this by converting the raw (compressed) video files to a different format before playing them. There are probably some free programs to do this. 'MPEG streamclip' is an excellent program for the MAC. Not sure if there is a windows version of this. Choose any high quality option to avi, wmv or mov (h264) and it probably will play just fine.

gyppo
Intermediate Member


Edmonton, AB
Canada

771 Posts

 Posted - 09/20/2011 :  6:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:


The "x" number gives you the actual speed. Each x = 150 KB/s.



Amazing, this is still the same standard that was used when CD-rom drives came out!

Vertical_Trekker
Junior Member


West Coast, British Columbia
Canada

220 Posts

 Posted - 09/20/2011 :  10:30 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Thanks for all the tips.

I called a local Wal-Mart and customer service told me that I can't get a refund because I had the camera for over two weeks. What a bummer because I never even opened the box and touched it until yesterday.

What's even more disappointing is that the camera has been used by someone else when I bought it. There were smudge marks, dust, dirt all over the camera. I spent about a hour cleaning the whole camera. It was my fault for not examining at the camera in the box before buying it. 2nd, it's Wal-Mart, so they don't have opened box items labelled for their products.

I went out and tested the video for the camera and it was very poor quality for 1080p. Everything was just horrible, slow focus, very washed out colours, grainy quality and image stabilization was the worst I've seen in a camera with IS.

I think I'll use this camera for casual social events and as a last resort backup camera when I'm outdoors. Skin tones and exposures photos are pretty damn good though. My Canon powershot G6 from 1994 takes better quality photos. Even a Sony camera (W550) which I purchased at Costco for about half the price of the Canon Elph 300HS produces for similiar quality photos.

These new P&S cameras are becoming worse and worse.
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