ClubTread Community
Register | Active Topics | Top 10 | Search | Guidelines | Report Spam
Username:
Password:
  Login   Donate
Support ClubTread
  Trail Wiki
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Regional Discussion
 British Columbia - Mainland
 Tire requirements on Sea-to-Sky
Bookmark and Share     Reply to Topic
Author Topic  

whitehelix
Junior Member


Vancouver, BC
Canada

141 Posts

 Posted - 11/30/2010 :  11:27 PM  Show Profile  Reply to this posting
It recently came to my attention that either snow tires or chains required on Sea-to-Sky after Alice lake and that there is actually a police check point.
I googled it, but info was little contradictory and somewhat outdated:
"Although it is recommended that motorists equip their vehicles with winter tread tires for travel on mountainous highways an all season tire with a "M&S" rating on the sidewall will suffice... The other option is to carry tire chains."
http://bc.rcmp.ca/ViewPage.action?siteNodeId=50&languageId=1&contentId=7418

"If stopped at a check, drivers who haven't installed winter tires or chains could be asked to turn back and may also face a fine."
http://www.newswire.ca/en/releases/archive/November2009/20/c3365.html

I’ve been driving to Whistler quite a few times every winter with just all season tires and nothing else. Was I just lucky? Are snow tires/chains required? Anyone has been stopped at the checkpoint?
ClubTread Supporter

Farmer
Advanced Member

Outward Bound author of the Seinfeld Thread, who builds his own snowshoes

Troy, MT
USA

3284 Posts

 Posted - 11/30/2010 :  11:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Regardless of the checkpoint, you should have winter tires. There is no comparison b/w true winters (especially studded) and "all seasons" (aka crappy in all seasons) There is ~1 sq.ft of material holding your life onto the road. I'd say its work a few hundred bucks. Cost me $500 for 4 good studded snow's on my truck, which really isn't much considering how long they will last and the consequences of not having them.

smac
Senior Member


north van, bc
Canada

1061 Posts

 Posted - 11/30/2010 :  11:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I don't think it's a permanent requirement. unlike heading east where it's required between certain months. I think they put temporary restrictions on bad days. but I could be wrong.

I bet most of that traffic doesn't.

also the M&S part is a little confusing. M&S arn't snow tires. snow tires have the mountain and flake symbol. if the sign says "snow tires required" I don't think M&S would suffice

Edited by - smac on 12/01/2010 12:02 AM

scottN
Senior Member


Vancouver, BC
Canada

1512 Posts

 Posted - 12/01/2010 :  07:35 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I believe the requirement for winter tires or carrying chains is permanent but it's only enforced when there's snow on the road.

woodyacat
Junior Member


chilliwack, bc
Canada

102 Posts

 Posted - 12/01/2010 :  08:30 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I lived in Whistler for a couple years (years ago mind you) and never saw a roadcheck for snow tires. That said, it wouldn't surprise me to see one now.

tu
Senior Member


Burnaby, BC
Canada

1709 Posts

 Posted - 12/01/2010 :  11:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Roadblock during snowy conditions is usually just north of Squamish, to turn people with no winter tires or chains back to Vancouver.

I recall reading in the Pique recently that Whistler (the town) tried to have the Sea-to-Sky designated a "mountain highway" that would require winter tires or chains during Oct-Apr (like Duffey), but was rejected. Concern was that this would decrease the tourist traffic.

J Mace
Senior Member


Vancouver, BC
Canada

1173 Posts

 Posted - 12/01/2010 :  2:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Roadblock during snowy conditions is usually just north of Squamish, to turn people with no winter tires or chains back to Vancouver.



yup right at the sign that says the above, ive seen them at Cypress and Seymour as well.

You cant even drive in the city in snowy conditions, if you get into an accident with poor tires then you can be put at partial blame by ICBC
ClubTread Supporter

Dru
Mountain Grammar Police

Sardonic sandbagging scoundrel, Cascade Climbers lobotomized spraymeister, space blanket flyer, new millennium vulgarian betaboy and friend to all squids

Climbing, a mountain
Canada

∞ Posts

 Posted - 12/01/2010 :  3:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They often have a roadblock like that on the Hemlock Valley road when it's snowy

RobP
Starting Member


Terrace, B.C.
Canada

22 Posts

 Posted - 12/01/2010 :  3:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
There are certain highways in the Province that you must have snow tires on in order to travel on. If you are stopped without them, you can be ticketed and turned around. I imagine if you go on the highways website you can find with highways they are manditory for.



RobP

corn_dog
Junior Member


Squamish
Canada

148 Posts

 Posted - 12/01/2010 :  7:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They stop cars during really bad conditions after Squamish usually during weekends. I haven't heard of them being there yet this year. There were really on the program before the olympics last year.

Dan

whitehelix
Junior Member


Vancouver, BC
Canada

141 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2010 :  08:37 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I drove to Whistler only on good days. If there is snow on the roads I don't drive even in Vancouver, maybe that's why I was so blissfully unaware.
Here is a reply I got from RCMP. They wrote a lot (and more stuff is in the links) and still there is no reply what's the tire requirements on that particular road :)

Thank you for writing to us.

The following is a link to our recent news release on winter tires.

http://bc.rcmp.ca/ViewPage.action?siteNodeId=143&languageId=1&contentId=17182

The relevant information with respect to winter tires requirement can be found in the above-noted web link.

In addition, you may find more information about winter tires at The Rubber Association of Canada http://www.rubberassociation.ca/ and Transport Canada http://www.tc.gc.ca/eng/roadsafety/safevehicles-safetyfeatures-wintertires-index-468.htm

There are detailed chain-up information at the Ministry of Transportation and Infrastructure page: http://www.th.gov.bc.ca/chains/ Chain requirement is for commercial vehicle and vehicles without winter tires.

All season tires without the M+S rating do not fit the definition of winter tires as defined in Sec. 208 of the Motor Vehicle Act.

All season tires with the M+S rating do fit the definition prescribed in Sec. 208. However, one should think of the rating of these tires barely fit the legal definition of winter tires.

For those who enjoy outdoor activities during winter in some part of the province, they should get the better winter tires - with the pictograph of a snowflake and peaked mountain. With the proper driving techniques and good winter tires, people will find themselves arriving at their winter sports destinations instead of getting stuck in a snowy ditch.

The M+S rating means the tread has wider gap. It may not provide adequate friction in snow and on ice during severe winter weather. The tires with the pictograph of a snowflake and peaked mountain are made from material that wouldn't stiffen up the rubber during cold temperature, in addition to the wider gap.

With the manufacturers marketing tires with new design every year, you may also wish to consult your local tire professionals at tire shops.

If you have further traffic-related enquiries, please contact us at EDIV_RCMP_HQ_Traffic_Services@rcmp-grc.gc.ca

For other traffic-related information, please visit our web site at www.traffic.bc.rcmp.ca

Regards,

BC RCMP Traffic Services

Edited by - whitehelix on 12/02/2010 11:03 AM

swebster
Senior Member


New Westminster, BC
Canada

1373 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2010 :  11:16 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Do you think you need winter tires for your bike?

Ryan Conroy
Junior Member


Say Nuth Khaw Yum, British Columbia
Canada

418 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2010 :  12:16 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by swebster

Do you think you need winter tires for your bike?



Not sure if this was a serious question or not, but the best thing to do with a bike is use the widest tires with the biggest tire you can, then deflate them until there is so little air pressure its almost like a tank tread. That advice comes from the first guy to do the Iditarod on a mountain bike.

As far as snow tires on cars, I bought a set of used deluxe alloy rims for my CR-V, which came with some all seasons, then a bought a set of used snow tires and put them on the old steel rims. This gives me a lot of flexibility, I can throw the snow tires on whenever I want quickly with the little hydraulic jack I got for $25 at CT. (Oh what a miracle those captured Chinese children are!) Sometimes I even put them on in the summer if I am heading onto a really rough logging road. I have never had to use chains in the winter with the proper snow tires. And the cost of the used rims with tires was less than a set of tires.

One thing that is very important when buying snow tires if you buy used is to make sure each tire is the same brand/model/condition, especially with AWD or 4WD. They are not like all seasons where you could mix types front/back, you will lose a lot of traction and could spin out in some conditions.

nomsha
Junior Member


Edmonton, Alberta
Canada

267 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2010 :  12:29 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
In some research I've done in other regions, the requirement for 'winter tires' usually includes both M+S tires and 'winter' tires with the snowflake symbol. From the RCMP email that whitehelix posted, it seems that's what they're saying as well.

M+S tires are 'all season, mud + snow' that qualify as meeting the bare minimum for winter tire criteria. True winter tires with the snowflake are better. Theoretically, they should have no issue with you using M+S tires when there is a winter tire requirement.

That being said, section 208 of the BC legislation is vague, but the RCMP response shows that the M+S rating is enough to qualify as a winter tire.
http://www.bclaws.ca/EPLibraries/bclaws_new/document/ID/freeside/96318_05

Putz
Starting Member


Kamloops, BC
Canada

11 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2010 :  6:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Regardless of whether it is required by law or not, common sense and responsibility to your fellow travelers and passengers should prevail. Getting stuck in a snowbank is usually merely an inconvenience. Granted, getting stuck on a back road could be life threatening but that opens a whole new topic about preparedness. The bigger issue is stopping distance. If a hazard was 100 meters away and the stopping distance was 110 meters with all seasons and 90 meters with snows would you be interested? I am certain that everyone will agree that a few hundred dollars spent on snow tires will be considered a mere pittance compared to the cost and anguish of hurting or killing someone. It could be some one in your car. Spend the money or take the bus.

Justa
Junior Member



175 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2010 :  6:56 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hemlock Valley Road is a bit different than the other lower mainland roads in that regardless of the type of tires you have you must carry chains at all times during the winter months.

no quitting
Advanced Member


Powell River, bc
Canada

2749 Posts

 Posted - 12/02/2010 :  9:34 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Putz
quote:
Regardless of whether it is required by law or not, common sense and responsibility to your fellow travelers and passengers should prevail. Getting stuck in a snowbank is usually merely an inconvenience. Granted, getting stuck on a back road could be life threatening but that opens a whole new topic about preparedness. The bigger issue is stopping distance. If a hazard was 100 meters away and the stopping distance was 110 meters with all seasons and 90 meters with snows would you be interested? I am certain that everyone will agree that a few hundred dollars spent on snow tires will be considered a mere pittance compared to the cost and anguish of hurting or killing someone. It could be some one in your car. Spend the money or take the bus.


I couldn't agree more!!!!! Well said :)

BCBoy88
New Member



59 Posts

 Posted - 12/06/2010 :  11:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by scottN

I believe the requirement for winter tires or carrying chains is permanent but it's only enforced when there's snow on the road.



In the past years (8+) if heavy snowfall there is a roadblock to check if your vehicle is capable to trek onwards and they let you decide. Otherwise they recommend you to pile up in the line up and wait for the plow.

But as others have said, common sense is to be prepared :) My trip to Oregon this past week we had snow tires on ... horrible gas mileage but safety first!

Daddio
Starting Member


Pemberton, BC
Canada

33 Posts

 Posted - 03/07/2011 :  8:00 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I agree with what Putz said. Common sense is so rare it should be a superhero. There are enough examples that Darwin was right on this highway everyday. It's winter and it shows up here - get good tires. The life you save could be mine.
  Topic  
 All Forums > Regional Discussion > British Columbia - Mainland Bookmark and Share     Reply to Topic

Register | Active Topics | Top 10 | Search | Guidelines | Report Spam