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 British Columbia - Vancouver Island
 IMPORTANCE OF COMMUNICATION IN REMOTE AREAS
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hikemike
Junior Member


Forbidden Plateau, BC
Canada

104 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  6:03 PM  Show Profile  Reply to this posting
Thought this deserved its own thread:


COMMUNICATION is ESSENTIAL on any wilderness trip!

I always carry a SAT phone, fully charged, in a water proof and shock protected pelican case, programmed with important phone numbers (i.e. 911, Weather Hotlines, BC Parks, BC Conservation Officer, your buddy's cell you left your route plan with in case there are changes on route, etc.)

On any coastal route I also carry a VHF radio (for emergencies and weather reports).

This is VERY IMPORTANT, like having shelter, or food, or water, or a first aid kit, or extra warm clothes!

I would also HIGHLY recommend taking a wilderness 1st aid course before heading on any backcountry trip (or have at least one member in your party that is a 1st aider!), ESPECIALLY if going into REMOTE terrain like the NCT or the mountains of Strathcona Park.

Its ALOT easier to get a rescue if someone in your party can call for help when the incident happens, and having someone that can administer 1st aid right then and there will make a traumatic experience ALOT more comfortable then not!

REDUCING RISK IS KEY!! HAVING THE MEANS TO DEAL WITH AN EMERGENCY IS IMPERATIVE!!!!!

Play Safe,

M



ClubTread Supporter

Dru
Mountain Grammar Police

Sardonic sandbagging scoundrel, Cascade Climbers lobotomized spraymeister, space blanket flyer, new millennium vulgarian betaboy and friend to all squids

Climbing, a mountain
Canada

∞ Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  6:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Boy, how did John Clarke ever survive those month long solo trips thru the Coast Mts with no Sat phone?! :o

platypus
Junior Member


Vancouver
159 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  6:42 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I prefer two tin cans and a lot of string. Each to their own I suppose.

burndug
Intermediate Member


Burnaby, BC
Canada

581 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  6:43 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Holy crap. That stuff must weigh a whack load. How did people survive before cell phones and all these un-necessary devices? I am waiting for an EMP to blow out all these devices and then we will see Darwinism take over.

Arnold
Intermediate Member


Port Moody, BC
Canada

782 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  6:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by hikemike

Thought this deserved its own thread:


COMMUNICATION is ESSENTIAL on any wilderness trip!

I always carry a SAT phone, fully charged, in a water proof and shock protected pelican case, programmed with important phone numbers (i.e. 911, Weather Hotlines, BC Parks, BC Conservation Officer, your buddy's cell you left your route plan with in case there are changes on route, etc.)


Aha, I almost agree with you, but you really need 2 SAT phones, just in case you lose one or it dies on you for some reason.

quote:
On any coastal route I also carry a VHF radio (for emergencies and weather reports).


And always carry 2 VHF radios.


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keefer
Junior Member



465 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  7:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
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darrenbell
Advanced Member


Penhold, Alberta
Canada

2146 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  7:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I always leave a trip schedule with someone with a call police after this time line has passed. This works for me.

I think a sat phone would be most helpful if I were a hiking guide as the OP, but in most situations I would consider the extra space required and weight a detriment or excess. Most folks have some form of first aid or at least knowledge of basic first aid. If I were to carry anything along these lines I think a SPOT would be my choice.

But hey, whatever blows your hair back, right.
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The Hiker
Advanced Member

Fleece thong wearin, Buntzen Lurkin, mystic poet mountain man and international spokesman of the friends of the white squirrel society

Port Moody, B.C.
Canada

6055 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  7:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
And for crying out loud DONT FORGET THE EXTRA BATTIRES!!!
Thanks for the lecture. Im sure you meant well.

hikemike
Junior Member


Forbidden Plateau, BC
Canada

104 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  7:38 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ha Ha, you guys are very funny!

Obviously all Senior and Advanced Members of Clubtread and anyone that lives in or around the Lower Mainland is exempt from having to carry essential communication gear!

Nice pic keefer:)

Read the stories about people looking for help after their buddy broke they're leg, and also guide a few hundred clients in the remote mountains and coastal areas of Vancouver Island where a phone or radio could save yours or your buddies life and just as importantly - your clients, whose husband is a liability lawsuit lawyer!

Guys, obviously my post is meant for people that don't know what they are doing when they head into the outdoors with no experience or proper equipment or a babysitter (AKA a guide) to take care of them.

Guess after you post on here more then 5000 times you are immune to common sense and the current (it is 2009!) mountain guide knowledge that a communication device is essential when in remote locations to call for help if needed.

Not quite as smart as you,

M



Edited by - hikemike on 07/08/2009 7:43 PM

hafilax
Senior Member


Vancouver, BC
Canada

1461 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  8:19 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
What did you expect? People to bow to your superior knowledge and immediately order SAT phones and hire guides for all future trips?

Wilderness 1st aid is way higher on the list of essentials than a SAT phone IMO. Why endanger a SAR crew when you could deal with it yourself?

How about this? Is it selfish and irresponsible to put yourself in a risky situation solely because you could call SAR on your SAT phone to pluck you out?

(All questions but one sentence )

icevixen
Intermediate Member


Too close to the city, BC
Canada

815 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  8:21 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote

goatboy
Junior Member



122 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  8:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Hikemike,
If you haven't noticed already, this is an extremely cliquey forum.
I agree with the radios, have used VHFs several times (you need to know the parks/local logging freqs & CTSS/DCS).
At least one person I know of would no longer be around had there not been a VHF radio.

johnrw
Junior Member



139 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  8:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
HOLY SHIT! I'm GOING to die, I need a sat phone NOW. I must never leave the safety of my house, oh no. mike whats with all the CAPS and !!!Go preach somewhere else man. How annoying.
Your either inexperienced, crazy, or an idiot!!!???

JW
ClubTread Supporter

The Hiker
Advanced Member

Fleece thong wearin, Buntzen Lurkin, mystic poet mountain man and international spokesman of the friends of the white squirrel society

Port Moody, B.C.
Canada

6055 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  8:54 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Its been my experience that electronic devices can and will fail at the time you may need it most.
First aid is a no brainer. So is learning to use a map & compass. If you rely on technology to get you out of a rough spot you can be sadly disappointed. People need to progress one step at a time until they gain confidence in the outdoors. If you are guiding these are useful due to the fact the people you have in your group will be very green (thats why they hired you in the first place!)
Common sense, self reliance, outdoor skills, map and compass use are things that you learn over time and may negate the need for packing pounds of extra gear. One can get a false sense of security with all the above or as said before. Hell why worry if I get into trouble, Ill just call someone. .. oops its raining and I left my phone on that stump , hope it works now ???
I have to admit I looked into a sat phone and was shocked at the cost. SPOT might be useful as I do go solo a good deal of the time. Then again I cant count the number of times my GPS died on me.
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The Hiker
Advanced Member

Fleece thong wearin, Buntzen Lurkin, mystic poet mountain man and international spokesman of the friends of the white squirrel society

Port Moody, B.C.
Canada

6055 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  9:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
If you haven't noticed already, this is an extremely cliquey forum.

Goatboy , I looked at your profile. Not much there sunshine so you will not gain much credibility and you have been around since 2005? Also your home page link is pretty childish for an adult board.

corn_dog
Junior Member


Squamish
Canada

148 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  9:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Part of the reason I go to some of the places I do is for the isolation, sense of freedom and being completely self reliant. Having a SAT phone would take away from that. I can understand having one in some situations, but I think you have gone a bit over board Mike.

Dan

goatboy
Junior Member



122 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  9:12 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Hiker;

Thanks for re- clarifying the obvious;
"this is an extremely cliquey forum".

'nuff said.......

hikemike
Junior Member


Forbidden Plateau, BC
Canada

104 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  9:23 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Ya, noticed it was cliquey, especially the Van members, still a great place to share info.

No bows expected, doesn't take superior knowledge to know that if your in unfamiliar remote terrain, with inexperienced people, any attempt at having some sort of communication is better then no attempt at all.

With todays extensive cell coverage, even that is good enough to have along in some cases (it works on many high ridge routes in East Strathcona Provincial Park) and they are very portable (as big as a power bar) and cheap.

On our remote coastal routes on the Island (ie. WCT and NCT) a VHF (as big as 3 power bars) is a really good idea, even if just to check the weather or let your boat shuttle (NCT) know your pickup time and location have changed.

A route plan including timelines left with a buddy is a form of communication, although not as efficient at calling in a rescue immediately as with a radio or a phone.

Only ever had to use my SAT phone to call folks and let them know i'm running late or staying out for an extra day or two. Still choice to have for an emergency evac if needed, and yes they are a bit bigger then all other devices and more expensive.

No reason to hire a guide if you know what you are doing and where you are going.

Also think putting yourself in riskier situations because you have the means to call for a rescue is dumber then not communicating at all.

Just my thoughts, take what you want from it.

And remember to have fun,

M



KARVITK
Advanced Member

Happy go lucky, plaid wearin, postholin, safeway gaitor sportin, old-school film shootin, giver of many regards

Abbotsford, B.C.
Canada

14467 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  9:36 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
My take is that common sense, knowing the risks in remote area hiking, and your own knowledge and abilities is key. Everyone to his own.

K

mrultralite
Intermediate Member



685 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  10:59 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mike ,i think your audience is the professional guide community, but they already know.
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AcesHigh
Advanced Member


Chilliwack, BC
Canada

7439 Posts

 Posted - 07/08/2009 :  11:05 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You're the kinda guy I'd like to hike with, that way I don't have to carry anything other than my lunch. Nothing wrong with being too safe at all. BUT never over rely on electronics as mentioned. One must learn how to fend themself without gizmos or gadgets as well. It's easy to drop a GPS or Radio and break it. If someone went into the bush far tracking with GPS and it falls and breaks they could be into trouble easily. Lots of people over rely on technology.
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