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 Snowshoeing and Backcountry Skiing
 Grouse, Cypress or Seymour pass?
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carmen
Junior Member



449 Posts

 Posted - 09/21/2003 :  08:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply to this posting
The mountain passes will be soon be selling for early discount and I was wondering which pass I should buy if I'm only planning to snowshoe this winter?

Which of these local mountains have the best to offer as far as recreational snowshoeing and snowshoe racing goes? I plan to have my own pair of snowshoes and will not be renting equipment.

By the way, what's up with Grouse? They send an email saying there will be a discount to renew exisiting passes and then when I try to renew they say I'm too late, they have a limit on it. This was not mentioned o the mail and there was no "time-limited" offer. Grrr, they've been rubbing me the wrong way with their greedy money grabbing all year.

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Hiker Boy
Advanced Member

opinionated-stove huggin'-fleece wearin'-arse burnin' hill virgin

Here
Canada

4666 Posts

 Posted - 09/21/2003 :  09:21 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The Mt. Seymour Ski Hill trails are not worth touching however you don't need a special pass to snowshoe in the prov park right next to the ski hill. You do need to pay that infernal prov park parking fee now though! I really like the trail to Dog Mountain and the ajoining loop around Dinky Peak.

I don't think the $70/season is worth it for Cypress either. The trails very boring and unchallenging!

The Grouse Mountain Pass is worthwhile. The backcountry on Grouse is very nice snowshoe terrian and they hold races up there too!



Plan the hike, hike the plan...

Spidergirl
Senior Member


Rmd, BC
Canada

1360 Posts

 Posted - 09/21/2003 :  10:38 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You might want to think about what your personal feelings are about the Grouse Mountain "Wildlife Refuge" before you make your decision. Personally, I have a hard time spending money there knowing that those bears could have been (and in my opinion SHOULD have been) rehabilitated and released back into the wild. I just don't think its right.

Here's what you can expect from the Provincial Park on Seymour: http://groups.msn.com/spidergirlbc/mountseymourwinter.msnw. I love it up there... especially in the winter.

Elfin Lakes is another excellent snowshoe trail in a Provincial Park: http://www.mountaingirl.net/elfin2003/photos.htm. Its a little further than just driving to the North Shore but well worth it.

A little further up the road, you have the Garibaldi Lake Trail: http://www.mountaingirl.net/garibaldi0403/photos.htm. I snowshoed this one in March so there wasn't snow for the first 4km but there was plenty up higher.


http://www.mountaingirl.net

The Mountains are calling and I must go. ~John Muir

mick range
Extreme Hoser

Trail running, bike hucking, fast packing, beer drinking collector of pine cones on a day pass

AKA

Dances with Trees

Forest Gnome Cabin
Canada

13560 Posts

 Posted - 09/21/2003 :  12:01 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
On Cypress,you can still take the public access trail up Hollyburn Mountain without paying to use the designated snowshoe trails.Also,I'm not sure they can charge you to use the Baden Powell either,which links to the Old Strachan Trail and the Hollyburn Trail.If someone knows more I'd appreciate any info....Mick

LongShadow
Founder

Big pack hiker who sleeps with bears in tent and falls on slippery logs

Langley, BC
Canada

7687 Posts

 Posted - 09/21/2003 :  12:11 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Mick's right about Cypress. The "good" trails don't require the pass. Also, the same with Seymour. I wouldn't waste my money on that family loop. You can access the Seymour summits without paying the fee. I should mention that the Seymour trail was probably the one I wouldn't take my snowshoes on. I had a way better time in my crampons. I cruised past lots of people sliding around on the ice. It is such a popular trail, it gets pounded down alot. Grouse isn't too bad, but I don't recall having to buy a pass last year - just the cost to use the gondola.

mick range
Extreme Hoser

Trail running, bike hucking, fast packing, beer drinking collector of pine cones on a day pass

AKA

Dances with Trees

Forest Gnome Cabin
Canada

13560 Posts

 Posted - 09/21/2003 :  12:32 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'm quite interested in doing Seymour this winter,so maybe I'll score some crampons.Have you done Lynn Peak in the snow,and ,if so,with what footwear? Mick

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martin
Advanced Member

Grouse Grinding, GPS carrying, lawn chair packing, bike riding North Shore tech addict who stares at Crown Mountain from his office window all day

North Vancouver
Canada

2018 Posts

 Posted - 09/21/2003 :  1:52 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I bought my Grouse pass a couple of weeks ago when they had that deal on ($35), and all the proceeds went to Lions Gate Hospital foundation. They had a "promo" on a couple of months ago, but I didn't see any advantage to getting one at that time. The snowshoeing is pretty good, but I think there are more places to snowshoe on Cypress. The one thing I do like about Grouse is that you don't waste gas driving up the big hill.

As far as Lynn Peak goes, we were up there a couple of years ago after it dumped snow in the city, but the trail was still so packed down that hiking boots were fine.




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Hiker Boy
Advanced Member

opinionated-stove huggin'-fleece wearin'-arse burnin' hill virgin

Here
Canada

4666 Posts

 Posted - 09/21/2003 :  4:45 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I'll second the Elfin lakes suggestion as a great place to snowshoe. Manning also offers some great snowshoeing and if you're really adventurous, you could go down to Baker and do Artist Point.

With regards to the Grouse Mountain Wildlife Refuge, I'm no expert on wildlife rehab but I'm sure glad we had some place to raise those orphaned bears rather than watching them die. It's nice to see them grown up to the point where they could be transferred to some larger habitat near Golden.

Plan the hike, hike the plan...



Edited by - Hiker Boy on 09/21/2003 4:47:06 PM

Spidergirl
Senior Member


Rmd, BC
Canada

1360 Posts

 Posted - 09/21/2003 :  5:49 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Two very experienced wildlife biologists in Nelson, BC had offered to take the bears, rehabilitate them and release them into the wild. There was a lot of controversy about this at the time.


http://www.mountaingirl.net

The Mountains are calling and I must go. ~John Muir
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seawallrunner
Advanced Member

double-double seeking, snow-chasing, short-cutting, vertical feet collector


4590 Posts

 Posted - 09/21/2003 :  7:58 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I snowshoed Artist Point the week after Mt Baker skihill was closed to skiers. We had a winter's paradise - empty trails, empty parking lot, sunshine... marvelous.

My question: is snowshoeing to Artist Point possible during the ski season? Or is it best to wait till April, after the hill operations close, to come out and play?

cheers - C Wall

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Hiker Boy
Advanced Member

opinionated-stove huggin'-fleece wearin'-arse burnin' hill virgin

Here
Canada

4666 Posts

 Posted - 09/22/2003 :  12:31 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Tundra, Marmot, Otter and I have done Artist Point it many times and usually when the ski hill is open. We have camped up there a couple of times. You are either hit or miss with the weather. It can turn on you quickly up there. There is a shortcut up to the top which we affectionally call "assburn hill". It is a wickedly steep hill which can sometimes be an avalanche hazzard.

Plan the hike, hike the plan...

EugeneK
Junior Member


Vancouver, BC
Canada

402 Posts

 Posted - 09/22/2003 :  8:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've been on all three local hills several times last winter. Mt. Seymour IMO is the most interesting for snowshoeing. Grouse is often restricted, and in the best case I've been able to almost reach the top of Goat Mountain. I've had a fantastic time on Cypress after the skiing season was over, but it's possible to use public trails even during the season - just ask for the free wilderness pass.
So in my opinion, all three mountains are worth spending time. Now neither is free, and with frequent use Seymour and Cypress may cost more in day fees than Grouse with its cheap gondola-only pass which should be good for snowshoeing.

carmen
Junior Member



449 Posts

 Posted - 09/22/2003 :  8:46 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I was informed that you have to pay for parking in Seymour and Cypress this winter...aaaagh, greedy greedy greedy.

Yes, I agree that I ought to try Elfin and other less local areas, I'm sure they're much better.

Maybe there will be a big dump in Vancouver and I can do the golf courses

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seawallrunner
Advanced Member

double-double seeking, snow-chasing, short-cutting, vertical feet collector


4590 Posts

 Posted - 09/22/2003 :  10:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
$5 at Cypress, Seymour and Grouse
$3 at Elfin Lakes, Garibaldi
still free at Whistler public parking lot (Singing Pass, anyone?)
Callaghan lake, too, is free. As is Brandywine, and Brew

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