ClubTread Community
Register | Active Topics | Top 10 | Search | Guidelines | Report Spam
Username:
Password:
  Login   Donate
Support ClubTread
  Trail Wiki
Save Password
Forgot your Password?

 All Forums
 Group Discussion
 Gotta Love Gear
 Grommets for Tyvek footprint?
Bookmark and Share     Reply to Topic
Author Topic  

Gulagger
Intermediate Member


Raincouver, British Columbia
Canada

753 Posts

 Posted - 09/28/2006 :  10:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply to this posting
Through the beauty of freecycle.org I have ended up with a roll-end of tyvek. I am planning to cut it up into a couple of footprints for my tents. For people who have experience with doing this... did you attempt to attach grommets so that it could be used like a factory footprint can? Do you have any other system for attaching tie down points, etc.? I know the conventional wisdom is to just cut it slightly smaller than the floor of the tent and call it a day but I am looking to try my hand at something slightly fancier and need advice. I don't want to cut this stuff up before I know if I should leave extra room for tie down attachments etc.

Thanks!
ClubTread Supporter

Hiker Boy
Advanced Member

opinionated-stove huggin'-fleece wearin'-arse burnin' hill virgin

Here
Canada

4667 Posts

 Posted - 09/28/2006 :  10:54 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I haven't added grommets to mine but I have a suggestion for when you do. Make sure you have cut , crumpled, and washed it first so that it's going to be more flexible when you try it. Otherwise there is a chance that the Tyvek might rip or tear.

----------------------------------------
"Got a gear idea? Drop me a line, hb@clubtread.com"
ClubTread Supporter

Dru
Mountain Grammar Police

Sardonic sandbagging scoundrel, Cascade Climbers lobotomized spraymeister, space blanket flyer, new millennium vulgarian betaboy and friend to all squids

Climbing, a mountain
Canada

∞ Posts

 Posted - 09/28/2006 :  5:10 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
tyvek doesn't make for very good footprints imo... it will leak under pressure. then you will find it makes a puddle between the tyvek and the tent

----------------------------------------
Don't become a well-rounded person. Well-rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish…

Gulagger
Intermediate Member


Raincouver, British Columbia
Canada

753 Posts

 Posted - 09/28/2006 :  6:07 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Dru, thanks for offering up the first negative thing I've heard about tyvek footprints. It's good to know. I have a relatively new MSR Hubba Hubba and don't want to spend the money on the factory footprint. The tyvek was free so I'm trying it out. I think I'll primarily end up using the footprint to protect the tent bottom from abrasion rather than water. We'll see though... the factory footprint isn't that much money... I just don't want to pay to carry more weight.
ClubTread Supporter

Dru
Mountain Grammar Police

Sardonic sandbagging scoundrel, Cascade Climbers lobotomized spraymeister, space blanket flyer, new millennium vulgarian betaboy and friend to all squids

Climbing, a mountain
Canada

∞ Posts

 Posted - 09/28/2006 :  6:20 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
there was a discussion of tyvek used as tarps, tents and footprints on cascadeclimbers.com a year or two ago and that's where i heard about its low water resistance. something like 80mm h20 where a coated tent has a water penetration resistance of over 2000mm h20...

what i was told is that they use it (tyvek) in the housing industry for vertical walls where the water will be trickling down, just to keep it from soaking in. not on floors or roofs where the water will pond. someone else said that if you kneel on tyvek on muddy ground or wet grass, that that is enough pressure that your knees will get wet, from water wicking through the tyvek to your pressure-exerting knees.

----------------------------------------
Don't become a well-rounded person. Well-rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish…

Edited by - Dru on 09/28/2006 6:23 PM
ClubTread Supporter

Nis
Intermediate Member


Langley, BC
778 Posts

 Posted - 09/28/2006 :  6:22 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
yea, good building paper leaks through after 60 minutes of continuous water and I don't think tyvex is much better than that.

goatboy
Junior Member



122 Posts

 Posted - 09/28/2006 :  6:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you're on a budget you might want to consider hitting one of the discount fabric places for coated nylon.
I've picked up some really ugly coloured stuff for less than a few bucks a yard & it's really light (but again, definately not fashion material).
Stitch it together, seam seal the stitching, add grommets & you've got a tarp/footprint for ~$10.00.
The GF uses them as beach mats on rocks & sand & use them as tarps after...still no leaks..I'm amazed.

PS: I've found my best(1954 Singer)sewing machine in a dumpster!

Edited by - goatboy on 09/28/2006 7:01 PM

Gulagger
Intermediate Member


Raincouver, British Columbia
Canada

753 Posts

 Posted - 09/28/2006 :  6:50 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I just realized that I have access to a Suter tester (it measures at what pressure the fabric begins to leak). The Suter test is commonly used for testing clothing (gore-tex, etc.) while the water column test is mostly used for tents (because it gives bigger numbers that sound more impressive to consumers). Anyway, apparently 1000mm water column test is equivalent to about 1.4psi on the Suter test. I will perform some experiments tomorrow and let you know what I find out.

It's interesting that after all the hype on tyvek as a footprint on this site a few years ago it's really not all its cracked up to be. I'd be interested to know if anyone on CT that has been using a tyvek footprint for awhile would like to weigh in on this issue.

As well, my MSR HH comes with a floor that is rated to 5000mm (compared to most MEC tents that come with a coating of 10,000mm). Should I maybe get some aftermarket gear waterproofing spray and add that to it or is it not going to make a big difference? The tent is really only 3 months old.
ClubTread Supporter

Dru
Mountain Grammar Police

Sardonic sandbagging scoundrel, Cascade Climbers lobotomized spraymeister, space blanket flyer, new millennium vulgarian betaboy and friend to all squids

Climbing, a mountain
Canada

∞ Posts

 Posted - 09/28/2006 :  6:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
it's probably fine for a lightweight abrasion resistant footprint when pitched on dry ground - but i think i'd want to have another footprint for camping on damp ground or in heavy rain?

----------------------------------------
Don't become a well-rounded person. Well-rounded people are smooth and dull. Become a thoroughly spiky person. Grow spikes from every angle. Stick in their throats like a puffer fish…

blackfly
Advanced Member

Manitoba's misadventurin' bushwhackin', dog sloggin', dehydratin', beer drinkin' biggie - who's eager to peak bag Mt Currie in a dress

Squamish
5078 Posts

 Posted - 09/28/2006 :  10:04 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Forget about the footprint altogether. Drive your tent till it's dead.
ClubTread Supporter

darrenbell
Advanced Member


Penhold, Alberta
Canada

2186 Posts

 Posted - 09/28/2006 :  10:41 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've used tyvek as well as lumber wrap from work and now I've bought the proper footprint for my SD clip flashlight tent. I found both the tyvek and the lumber wrap too fragile (ripping) to use grommets in. I don't depend on the ground sheet to deflect moisture away from the tent tub(floor) as much as I depend on it to protect the floor from dirt, twigs and tree pitch. All said, I do prefer the factory footprint as it is made to rig-up with either your poles or tent pegs.
ClubTread Supporter

Q
Senior Member

chocolate lovin, Bailey's slurpin, cold feet hatin', veggie eatin', true Cancerian water lovin', CT smilin', boulder dodgin', nosummitosis survivor


1600 Posts

 Posted - 09/29/2006 :  01:39 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I use tyvek as a footprint for protection and have had some (a fair bit at times) rain to no effect. (I stayed dry) Not sure about pitching on really wet ground yet. Shouldn't the bottom of the tent be pretty much waterproof? That is what I was told? YOu mean they lied to me?
I also use a small sheet of tyvek to sit on when hiking and noticed once that in the snow I still got a slightly wet bum.
As for inserting grommets I simply have no idea how it would take. You have a whole roll?? Just try it!!

johngenx
Advanced Member


Finally stopping that crazy suffering that is ice, climbing to concentrate on great ski tours!
3745 Posts

 Posted - 09/29/2006 :  06:12 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Gulagger

As well, my MSR HH comes with a floor that is rated to 5000mm (compared to most MEC tents that come with a coating of 10,000mm). Should I maybe get some aftermarket gear waterproofing spray and add that to it or is it not going to make a big difference? The tent is really only 3 months old.



I have put my MicroZoid, Fury, Hubba Hubba and Mutha Hubba through their paces and that includes torrential downpours and pitching with a rain-caused mini-river running up against the floor for two days. Leak? None. I've NEVER had a leak on the floor of an MSR tent.

I use a footprint with the Mutha for car camping to protect the floor, but rarely carry it when away from the car.

Gulagger
Intermediate Member


Raincouver, British Columbia
Canada

753 Posts

 Posted - 09/30/2006 :  1:55 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So I subjected a scrap of Tyvek left-over from making the footprint to the suter tester yesterday morning. The scrap was from the part of the roll that was exposed when I got it and was a little bit scrunched but didn't seem to have any holes... at least that is what I thought. When I put it on the Suter tester at about 1psi it developed pin-prick holes that squirted water up at me! It was hard to tell if the rest of the tyvek was letting water through as well. We tried using a different section of the piece and also ended up with the same pinprick holes. This doesn't bode well - if mildly abraded tyvek leaks I don't know that it is the best footprint in wet conditions. I will probably keep the tyvek footrpint to use car camping, etc. but I may still think about getting the factory footprint and in the mean time continue to pitch my tent very carefully.
ClubTread Supporter

Sodbuster
Senior Member


High River, (just south of Calgary eh!), Alberta
Canada

1872 Posts

 Posted - 10/12/2006 :  12:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I've always used thin poly (like vapour barrier used in house construction, 8mil or so) for backpacking. Very light, very small, but a pain in the wind. This is more to act as a vapour barrier stopping ground moisture from contacting the tent floor. So long as it doesn't poke out under the fly it works well. For car camping I use a much thicker poly for the same vapour barrier purpose but also for puncture resistance since most car-camp tent pads (in Alberta anyway) seem to be made of gravel. Choosing a tent site without any pokey bits is not usually a problem and sometimes putting a stuff sack or similar over an unavoidable rock is an option (beneath the tent). Tyvek or lumber tarps are actually designed to breath, shedding surface water (like rain) but letting moisture on the inside to slowly escape. Like Gortex for wood. The tent specific tent footprints seem to be a good idea for prolonging the life of a tent as zippers and floors seem to be the weaker points in tent construction.
  Topic  
 All Forums > Group Discussion > Gotta Love Gear Bookmark and Share     Reply to Topic

Register | Active Topics | Top 10 | Search | Guidelines | Report Spam