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 Paddling, Biking, and Other
 Kayaks at costco
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Farstrider
Starting Member


Langley, British Columbia
Canada

11 Posts

 Posted - 03/25/2005 :  5:53 PM  Show Profile  Reply to this posting
A while ago they were selling kayaks at costco for $440 or something like that and now there is a $50 dollar coupon for it. When I went to check it out though, they were already sold out and I was put at the bottom of a rather long waiting list.

Has anyone else seen this kayak? Is it any good?
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Farmer
Advanced Member

Outward Bound author of the Seinfeld Thread, who builds his own snowshoes

Troy, MT
USA

3285 Posts

 Posted - 03/25/2005 :  6:40 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
So are the Kayaks $50 or are they $50 off?

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blackfly
Advanced Member

Manitoba's misadventurin' bushwhackin', dog sloggin', dehydratin', beer drinkin' biggie - who's eager to peak bag Mt Currie in a dress

Squamish
5078 Posts

 Posted - 03/25/2005 :  7:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I doubt very much that any kayak at Costco is very good. I'm not up on the terms of construction, but I do know that they will be very heavy and probably not very seaworthy. That said, it would probably make a good cottage kayak for the local pond.

If you had a link with a product I could make a more accurate assesment.

Farstrider
Starting Member


Langley, British Columbia
Canada

11 Posts

 Posted - 03/25/2005 :  11:35 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
They're $50 dollars off.

I'll try and find the name of it, on first glance it didn't seem any different from the kayaks they sell at Coast mountain sports but I'm a newb so I don't know what to look for.

Has anyone seen it? What would I look for in a kayak?

Farstrider
Starting Member


Langley, British Columbia
Canada

11 Posts

 Posted - 03/25/2005 :  11:39 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I think this is it but not sure

http://www.costco.com/Browse/Product.aspx?Prodid=11039350&whse=BC&topnav=&cat=2271&hierPath=2271*

What do u guys think?
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haidabear
Intermediate Member


delta, bc
Canada

655 Posts

 Posted - 03/26/2005 :  07:43 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
You haven't indicated how you plan to use the kayak. Is it for rivers, lakes, messing about, ocean, day, touring?

blackfly
Advanced Member

Manitoba's misadventurin' bushwhackin', dog sloggin', dehydratin', beer drinkin' biggie - who's eager to peak bag Mt Currie in a dress

Squamish
5078 Posts

 Posted - 03/26/2005 :  09:46 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Well, for $400 it could be ok, depending on what you are gonna use it for.

It's made of polyethelene, which is really heavy.

If I were you and had $400 to spend on a boat, I'd go used. You could find a much better boat for the same price. Check out some of the paddling websites to see what others think=

www.paddling.net
www.myccr.com

Grizzled
Junior Member


Calgary, Alberta
228 Posts

 Posted - 03/26/2005 :  11:44 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
A rule of thumb I saw on a consumer show is take most items at large box stores. If the item is under $50 then the same quality of product is 75% more for the same quality at other retail outlets (much higher mark up and overhead). If over $50 then a 50% price difference. (your $400 kayak would be $600 at MEC, etc.)

Also the 'quality' issue is largely a myth. Sears, Costco, Walmart, etc. have much more clout with suppliers and are much more quality oriented than smaller retailers claim. A supplier selling 10,000 sleeping bags to Canadian Tire is going to take much more care in quality and service than an order for 100 to a smalle retail outlet. Who do you think gets the priority? Who gets the first 'call back' when a message is left or a quality issue needs attention? Of course it's Walmart, Costco, Sears, etc. who get the golden treatment from suppliers.




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After hiking for 35 years I still haven't reached the end of the trail.

Bishop
Intermediate Member

yukon hankerin' intrepid dog lovin' fleet footed adventure racing pie packing poet who is ever keen to cave hunt, route find, night hike, and has finally introduced Bishop to Mt. Bishop

Whitehorse, Yukon
Canada

934 Posts

 Posted - 03/27/2005 :  11:52 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I don't know if this will help you with your purchase? but this is my thought on the topic.

I have thought previously on buying myself a kayak. After some good thinking on storage hassles, and transportation hassles - I decided that it is much better for me to just rent one whenever I need one. That way I can use different kinds, try out new models, and choose between unstable fast ones or stable slow ones depending on conditions.

Also remember that the kayak is only the beginning of the expense - $200 or so for a paddle - $100 for PFD - $200 for other misc gear (sprayskirt, throwrope, etc). Those things are all included in a rental.



screeclimber2
New Member



69 Posts

 Posted - 03/27/2005 :  1:17 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
We zipped down to see them at Cosco here in Calgary. They look even better built than the Azul kayaks at Coast Montain Sports ($200 more) or the same size Kayaks at MEC (way,way more). The Costco kayaks come with the spray skirt. You can get a certified PFD for $30 and a decent paddle for $59.

If you have a Bargain Finder where you live, look through the ads. You can get a PFD for 10 bucks. Canoes and Kayaks are cheap if you buy them in late Fall. Put in a free ad 'Kayak wanted'.

Bishop
Intermediate Member

yukon hankerin' intrepid dog lovin' fleet footed adventure racing pie packing poet who is ever keen to cave hunt, route find, night hike, and has finally introduced Bishop to Mt. Bishop

Whitehorse, Yukon
Canada

934 Posts

 Posted - 03/27/2005 :  1:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Did you get one?

mick range
Extreme Hoser

Trail running, bike hucking, fast packing, beer drinking collector of pine cones on a day pass

AKA

Dances with Trees

Forest Gnome Cabin
Canada

13582 Posts

 Posted - 03/27/2005 :  5:26 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Saw one this weekend,it's not ideal for sea touring,more for slow rivers or lakes.Doesn't have a rudder,length is about 9',I think.Nice little boat,though...

Farstrider
Starting Member


Langley, British Columbia
Canada

11 Posts

 Posted - 04/02/2005 :  12:15 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Sorry it took me so long to reply.

I don't know what I'll be doing with it. At the time I thought I would use it for lakes, slow rivers and ocean paddling. I think I might sign up for a course and try some rapids. I did it a while ago on a raft and was fun, I imagine it'll be 10 times funner in your own kayak. What sort of kayak would be good for that sort of thing?

I was thinking maybe I could use that kayak for a trip along Bowron lake, etc

Maybe I'll just rent, or keep looking.

ofmik
Starting Member


Grande Prairie, Alberta
Canada

15 Posts

 Posted - 04/26/2005 :  10:14 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The kayaks that are displayed at our Costco are a plastic rotomoulded single with a water tight storage comapartment in the back and a large comfortable seat with footpegs. I started paddling in a boat similar to this but wider. If you don't want to spend lots of cash, this would be an excellent beginners boat. Perfect for rivers, creeks, lakes and protected ocean bays, it would give you a good idea about the sport. I would suggest getting a sprayskirt if you plan to be out in windy or rough waters. The other benifit of buying from Costco is that if you don't like it, just bring it back for a refund with no questions asked (within 6 months at least). I wouldn't hesitate! Have fun and happy paddling!

hobo_hiker
New Member


Coquitlam, B.C
Canada

52 Posts

 Posted - 07/09/2005 :  12:58 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Here's my 2 cents :
Something that short(or just about anything anything under 12 ft,really) isn't going to track worth crap if you try to keep decent pace over open water(lake of any sort) and you won't fit much gear in it.
With a 500$ budget try shopping used. you may find some deals.

Backroader
Senior Member


Tumbler Ridge, BC
Canada

1365 Posts

 Posted - 07/11/2005 :  12:24 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Grizzled


Also the 'quality' issue is largely a myth. Sears, Costco, Walmart, etc. have much more clout with suppliers and are much more quality oriented than smaller retailers claim. A supplier selling 10,000 sleeping bags to Canadian Tire is going to take much more care in quality and service than an order for 100 to a smalle retail outlet. Who do you think gets the priority? Who gets the first 'call back' when a message is left or a quality issue needs attention? Of course it's Walmart, Costco, Sears, etc. who get the golden treatment from suppliers.



Um, you're not talking quality, you're talking quantity. Canadian tire stocks 20 lb Woods bags. I don't really care if they are cheaper, because I'm not usually going to go for that type of bag for backpacking. I want something that is lighter, but just as warm. For that, you have to go to a specialty store because backpackers aren't Canadian Tire's prime market. Same thing with tents. For cartop camping, I have a 12-man Woods for a family of three, because I can do it; for Backpacking I have a Hennessey Hammock, which Canadian Tire and Costco don't carry, because there isn't enough of a market for them. I have to go MEC, or a boutique shop, or order direct from Tom.

The gear snobs ( like me) and the hardcore kayakers will turn their nose up at a $400 mass manufactured boat, because it just won't perform like something that's a higher quality. That doesn't mean that it isn't good for noodling around in, and it can be a great introduction to the sport. But if it's something that you're planning on getting serious about, it might prove to be a waste of money to buy a heavier, less responsive boat, only to find out that in a year or two, you are demanding more of it than it can provide, and need to but a $1000 boat.

The question: save your money initially and wind up spending $1400 total, or put out more at the start and wind up only using the kayak twice. Aye, there's the rub. Part of me (the gear snob) says go for the better boat, because you'll like it better, so there's more chance of continuing on. The other part of me says go for the cheaper boat, and once you're ready for a better boat, you'll probably know exactly what you want and how to get it.

If it is the one that is linked to, know that it is a river boat; designed for moving quickly from side to side. It is not for ocean kayaking, and will be a pain to handle even on a lake. It'll be good for not-too-whitewater. I wouldn't want to take it on the Bowron though. For touring, you want to look at a longer boat, preferably with a rudder.

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Wake
Starting Member



18 Posts

 Posted - 07/16/2005 :  3:31 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Most things that are specialized like that from costco seem to be made cheaply. I've bought a wakeboard, and a bike from costco and niether were all that good. Though I guess you never really know.

dfitz
Starting Member



1 Posts

 Posted - 01/08/2008 :  09:02 AM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Having started with a roto-moulded (reformable plastic) kayak and moving on to a fibreglass kayak I have one good reason to buy cheap first. If you find you don't like the hassle of loading the kayak onto the roof (usually by yourself), driving to the water edge (for short boat like this quiet waters are mandatory), unloading, setting up, paddling, and then reversing the process. Also, paddling around with a paddle that were told was correct for your height (no mention of cockpit width, arm length, etc. was made!?). Anyway, after a few solo trips you will either find that this is indeed a sport you can embrace OR not! If the latter, you can more easily sell the cheaper kayak to the next person than you could a more expensive (longer, narrower, faster, etc.) one.

And, as one person pointed, out you WILL spend more money for the mandatory Coast Guard required equipment, PFD, throw-line, bailer, signalling device, waterproof light, probably a paddle float of some sort, a dry bag/box for your camera, etc., you get the picture.

Best bet, rent a kayak for 3 or 4 times and see how it feels. Then make the more permanent decision to spend more money on a good kayak.

Source out folks in your area to find other kayakers, we always welcome newcomers and want them to enjoy our hobby as much as we do. Good luck on which ever road, uh, water way, you travel.

norona
Senior Member


North Vancouver, BC
Canada

1076 Posts

 Posted - 01/08/2008 :  2:57 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
The boat is not cheaply made. It will be strong and paddle fine. However the best advise here is what I would suggest. Take the $400.00 and get a pass for the entire season which includes everything. That way you can bike to your rental boat, try every boat they have and even try doubles if you take a friend and get them to pay their half...

This way you learn in a way better boat which does not have a gapping open hole that will fill with water without a massive spray skirt the size of a small sale. There is no question that this is a good boat however I would not put my worst enemy in that on a river with rapids or out in the ocean in waves unless it was a super hot day and warm water.

Sure you can own all the gear cheaply with a 59 dollar paddle and 10 dollar life vest but that stuff will fit like crap be bulky and uncomfortable and highly inefficient. If your new to paddling then spend the season renting. You will learn more faster with the better equipment and then make a much better assesment of what you need if you do decide to go and buy and it will cost you less money than buying this POS and then having to sell it to buy another one.

The boat will work but doing the Bowron Lakes in that thing would be a good punishment for prisoners, Not outdoor enthusiast.

eeyun
Senior Member


Vancouver, BC
Canada

1131 Posts

 Posted - 01/08/2008 :  5:25 PM  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah!

Zombie thread!!!!

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